Basil Pesto Recipe for People on a Low Lectin Diet

Basil Pesto Recipe for People on a Low Lectin Diet

Basil pesto is a delicious, traditional spread used primarily in Italian cuisine. Today, you can find that basil pesto is also included in many of Dr. Gundry’s Plant Paradox Approved recipes, as it could be considered a superfood all on its own! Here is the secret recipe for Dr. Gundry’s delicious basil pesto for those on a low lectin diet.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil 

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is one of the healthiest foods on Earth and a main staple in this pesto recipe. Loaded with healthy fats, EVOO has been used traditionally in Mediterranean kitchens for centuries due to ease of use and its rich, buttery flavor. And that doesn’t even include its wide range of health benefits! EVOO is known to offer a healthy dose of protective antioxidants and essential vitamins and minerals like vitamin K, and vitamin E, and others. It’s also rich in iron, sodium, calcium, and potassium, along with a sizeable amount of healthy fats.1 

Within this assortment of vital nutrients, extra virgin olive oil also provides one rare antioxidant known as oleocanthal, which has been shown to help reduce inflammation in the body, even in those who suffer with autoimmune issues.2 And when it comes to a healthy heart, EVOO should be at the top of your shopping list! You see, since olive oil is a significant source of monounsaturated fats, it also provides one rare fatty acid called omega-9, or oleic acid, which is well known to help reduce high blood pressure.3 

Blissful Basil 

Basil is a flavorful herb with almost 150 different varieties. Commonly found in herb gardens, basil offers a range of beneficial health properties. As an antimicrobial agent, basil has been shown to combat a variety of viruses, bacteria, yeasts, and molds.4 

Research suggests that one type of basil, also known as tulsi may be able to boost your good mood which may be a result of the essential oils that basil contains and it work as a greatest supplements for weight loss.5Basil essential oil can be found inside its leaves. Here, it offers various components, such as estragole, linalool, eugenol, sabinene, and limonene, known to offer effective antibacterial properties. These very same compounds have been shown to help reduce inflammation.6 

Crunchy Pine Nuts 

You can use any type of nuts to make pesto, but recent research has shown that pine nuts may help to reduce inflammation.7  

 

More on inflammation: Read How Lectin Shield Can Help

 

Dr. Gundry’s Basil Pesto Recipe (for Low-Lectin Dieters) 

If you are following a low lectin diet, be sure to try Dr. Gundry’s Basil Pesto! With its rich, buttery taste it will add delicious flavor to any recipe. 

Ingredients: 

  • 2 cups fresh basil leaves 
  • ½ cup freshly grated parmesan 
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil 
  • ⅓ cup toasted pine nuts 
  • 2 cloves garlic 
  • Sea salt, to taste 

Directions: 

Making Dr. Gundry’s basil pesto is so simple! Start by tearing the basil leaves off of a fresh basil plant. You may also use basil leaves purchased at your local grocery. Then, rinse them off with water and toss the basil leaves (along with the rest of the ingredients) into a powerful blender or food processor. Pulse the blender a few times, making sure that you are opening the lid to check the consistency of your pesto. 

Then, add another drizzle of Extra Virgin Olive Oil into the blender, and continue to pulse. You can periodically check back on the mixture and adjust it to your liking with more olive oil.

NOTE: If you desire a smoother basil pesto, you can add a good amount of EVOO and turn the blender on low until you reach the consistency you want.

And there it is! Dr. Gundry’s Low Lectin Basil Pesto is easy to make and so versatile that if you decide to make a batch, you may also want to store some for later. In fact, just toss some into an ice tray and keep it in the freezer. The olive oil will retain the active compounds of the other ingredients so that you can give a nutrient-filled boost to any of your favorite recipes.

Learn more about lectins and protecting yourself with Lectin Shield on Pinterest.

You can toss a flavorful basil pesto cube into stews, soups, or even smoothies. Add it to a whipped avocado dip or make a miracle out of a plain spaghetti dinner. It’s totally up to you! But no matter how you use Dr. Gundry’s Low Lectin Shield Basil Pesto Recipe in your kitchen, it’s sure to please – all year long!

References: 

  1. Extra Virgin Olive Oil Nutrition facts & Calories. SELF Nutrition Data.com.
  2. Puertollano MA, Puertollano E. Olive oil, immune system and infection.Nutr Hosp. 2010 Jan-Feb;25(1):1-8. 
  3. Alonso A, Ruiz-Gutierrez V. Monounsaturated fatty acids, olive oil and blood pressure: epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence. Public HealthNutr. 2006 Apr;9(2):251-7.
  4. RattanachaikunsoponP, Phumkhachorn P. 

Antimicrobial activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum) oil against Salmonella enteritidis in vitro and in food. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2010;74(6):1200-4. Epub 2010 Jun 7. 

  1. Marc Maurice Cohen. Tulsi -Ocimumsanctum: A herb for all reasons. J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2014 Oct-Dec; 5(4): 251–259. 
  2. Nordqvist, J. (2016, September 27). Nutrition / Diet Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine Basil: Health Benefits and Nutritional Information. Retrieved December 28, 2016,
  3. Alexander N.Shikov,ÆOlga N. Pozharitskaya. Anti-inflammatory effect of Pinus sibirica oil extract in animal models. June 2008.